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posted 18 hours ago

ETA Coach shared ETA Coach Lake Placid Training Camp 2017's video.

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posted 14 hours ago

Scenes from our 2017 Lake Placid Training Camp

ETA Coach

posted 22 hours ago

Scenes from our 2017 Lake Placid Training Camp

ETA Coach

posted 5 days ago

Looking for a new ride? Take a look at one of our athlete's bikes that is currently up for sale. He is asking $6,000. If you're interested shoot us a message and we can pass it along to him! The bike is located in Philadelphia; I'm sure he'd deliver it in exchange for a 6 pack of beer. -2016 Giant Trinity Advanced Pro 0 - Size Medium -Full Shimano Dura Ace 9070 -Stages power meter (2nd Gen.) -Zipp Vuka Alumina Evo extensions (70mm rise) -There are a few options for saddles I can throw in (Adamo, Fizik) --ENVE 8.9 Tubulars, DT Swiss 240 hubs - 22mm Continental Competitions glued with plenty of life left = -Catalyst wheel cover -2x front hydration bottles (1st and 2nd gen.) -2x bento boxs (1st and 2nd gen.) Di2 charger -All additional fit materials that came with the bike (spacers for the cockpit) *not included: Zipp BTA mount and cage, pedals

ETA Coach

posted 1 week ago

Successfully racing in heat is not about sodium tablets, but harnessing your ego. It’s that time of year again when everyone races sub par in the heat. I have a rude awakening for 95% of all endurance athletes: An electrolyte concoction or magic supplement will not help you race faster or avoid cramping in the heat. To be successful at racing in the heat, you need to train more in the heat, taper correctly, set realistic goals, and race/pace within your fitness level. This requires patience, diligence, and leaving your ego at home. Coach Jason Kilderry www.etacoach.com

ETA Coach

posted 1 week ago

Recovery Requires Diligence Last week, I had the pleasure of presenting on recovery for endurance athletes The Running Place in Newtown Square, PA. I always enjoy the questions that this topic elicits regarding compression wear, cryotherapy, and recovery boots. Specifically, athletes always inquire, "are these recovery devices worth their claims?" To be honest, I can’t make that judgement, because I have not fully read all the literature on this topic. However, I do know that the research is limited and not conclusive. While I don’t think these recovery devices can hurt the athlete, the athlete should focus more on effective, simple, and cheaper modes of recovery: - Sleep - Replenishing the energy demands we place on our bodies - Managing Stress The impact the above mentioned variables have on recovery are far more beneficial than any other approach. Making the necessary improvements of these variables requires diligence, patience, and attention to detail. Remain consistent with sleep, meeting your energy demands, and managing stress because the more consistent you are with these variables, the bigger the benefit. Coach Jason Kilderry

ETA Coach

posted 2 weeks ago

Many athletes cling to the story of David and Goliath to advocate the “underdog” and how despite their huge underdog status going into training for something, they can complete the task because of their will or perseverance. I love that attitude, but Malcolm Gladwell tells this story like it actually should be told. In this story, David, the supposed smaller, less skilled, child shepherd and non-warrior is not the underdog but is a skilled practitioner in “artillery” in ancient warfare. His sling was not a child’s toy, but a devastating weapon. David was a “slinger” as they called it; his accuracy was part of what he was trained to do and slingers played a crucial role in ancient warfare. David used his skill, not his strength, to take down the huge giant. Goliath is just a sitting duck. He is huge and slow! David was no underdog, but a skilled practitioner whose years and years of training led him to his victory. Underdog stories are great, but when it all boils down to the goals you are trying to achieve, luck and words of encouragement play only a small part in your success. Your attention to detail and willingness to work hard is what will really bring you triumph. "The will to succeed is important, but what's more important is the will to prepare." - Bobby Knight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziGD7vQOwl8

ETA Coach

posted 2 weeks ago

Here are the Do’s and Don'ts of what replicated research has shown to improve your running: Do Run more frequently. Run harder. Run longer. Strength train with an emphasis on progressing towards explosive movements. Don’t Change your technique. Rely on footwear to make you “faster." Incorporate the “Do’s” into your workouts over night. Be fooled by “magic” supplements or training regimens. Additionally, here are 2 key factors to always keep in mind when setting your running goals: 1. One hard workout does not improve your running. Many consistent, specific, and often monotonous workouts improve your running. Most importantly, these repeated workouts increase the likelihood of long-term running success. 2. The less experienced runner can do less specific training and still see improvements in running. However, the more experienced the runner, the more specific the training needs to be. Coach Jason Kilderry Owner www.etacoach.com

ETA Coach

posted 2 weeks ago

Coaches, remember that your relationship with an athlete will not last forever. It’s your job to not only design a plan and be a supporter, but also to educate, encourage critical thinking and problem solving, to sweat the small stuff, and, most importantly, to think for themselves. This will make the coaching experience more enjoyable, successful, and it will prepare the athlete for continued future successes. Coach Jason Kilderry

ETA Coach

posted 2 weeks ago

ETA Coach shared ETA Coach Open Water Swims: Camp Ockanickon's photo.

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posted 3 weeks ago

Practice Open Water Swim Races? Who's in?!

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posted 3 weeks ago

“People have forgotten to make the hard days harder and the easy days easier.” Dr. Michael Joyner

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posted 3 weeks ago

You’re not Micheal Phelps or Katie Ledecky. The number one question swimmers ask me about open water swimming is, “Why can I swim 2 miles in the pool, but, after 200 yards in open water, I’m out of breath, start to panic, and begin to tread water?" Below are very simple solutions to this common problem: -You’re not Micheal Phelps or Katie Ledecky. I’m serious! We, including myself, often go out way too hard at the start of our open water swims and races. Stay within YOUR fitness level, not the other swimmers around you. -You change the way you swim. Adrenaline and anxiety can be present at the start of a race, and you forget how to swim. No, not actually how to swim, but how YOU swim. Often swimmers take 2-4 more strokes before breathing compared to in a pool. In addition, the stroke frequency or length tends to change. Small changes to your stroke are to be expected, but make sure you have practiced and are prepared for those changes. -Worry about things you can control such as your pace, intensity, and technique mentioned above. Do not focus on what you can’t control such as the depth or temperature of the water. Pace yourself, focus on YOUR technique, and worry about things you can control. Coach Jason Kilderry

ETA Coach

posted 3 weeks ago

Be Boring We often incorporate new, sexy, and exciting changes into our training in the hopes of reaching the next level of performance in lieu of working on the basics. Why? The basics are not sexy and exciting and are often boring. However, minor changes in training load, consistency, phycological outlook, sleep, nutrition, and recovery habits will not only bring you that next level, but will also surpass it. Be boring. Seek out the fundamentals.

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posted 4 weeks ago

One word: WOW

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posted 1 month ago

I'm not one for posting "motivational" or "rise and grind" videos, but this one is fairly awesome. If this does not get you fired up about your workouts this week I don't know what will!

ETA Coach

posted 1 month ago

Is Social Media Affecting your Athletic Performance and Enjoyment? Growing up, I was a terrible basketball player, but it was my favorite sport. After being cut from the 7th grade team, I got over my embarrassment and disappointment and asked the coach, "Ok, so how can I improve?” In light of my affinity for endurance sports, I think we all know that this did not end in comeback story akin to Michael Jordan being cut from his high school team. I often think back to this time and wonder if my feelings of defeat or failure would have been amplified by social media. Today we post our workouts, nutrition, and athletic performances on an almost daily basis for the world to see. How many times have we done this while training for an event? The aftermath of a disappointing performance then consumes us by worrying what to say to our friends, family, and social media audience. We then write a race report that should be written for us to learn from, but we spend more time wondering what people will think, not how we can improve in our training and race performances. This mentality may be affecting your performance and enjoyment of your sport. In fact, research shows how physiological stress can hinder performance. Take a step back and evaluate how we value our social media status. We often publicly set these high and sometimes unrealistic expectations for ourselves then suffer the “social media” aftermath. One of my athletes offered the following insight: whether you perform your best or your worst, there is a good chance the large majority of your followers and friends, if not all of them, will read it then move on with their lives. They are not dwelling on it nor thinking about it the rest of the day. You may be, but they aren’t. We all fall victim to social media stress and anxiety. Once you realize that this about you and no one else, it very well may improve your performance and enjoyment of training and racing. Think critically, question often, and train smart. Coach Jason Kilderry

ETA Coach

posted 1 month ago

Only 3 spots left!

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posted 1 month ago

ETA Coach shared The Philly 10K's photo.

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posted 1 month ago

Today's Open Water Swim is cancelled, but Sunday's is Not!

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posted 1 month ago

A Healthy Relationship with Sport Data The current issue of the International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance is devoted to monitoring training load. This issue highlights mathematical modeling, statistics, blood markers, muscle biopsies, heart rate variability, w prime (W’), psychosocial variables, nutrition, rate of perceived exertion scales, and many more methods of monitoring stress on the body. It's a fascinating read. While I use quite a few of these methods with my athletes, it is important to maintain a healthy relationship with the overwhelming amount of data. Use the data as a guide and a tool to make training decisions, but don't obsess over the numbers as they will never be 100% accurate. Often, noting “how you are feeling” during a key workout or week of training will mirror what the data shows. However, I will never completely dismiss data because it plays an important role in communication. As much as I’m a data nerd, and would love to understand more of the mathematical/statistical side of these methods, effective communication from my athletes will always trump data. http://journals.humankinetics.com/toc/ijspp/current#/toc/ijspp/12/Suppl+2 Coach Jason Kilderry

ETA Coach

posted 1 month ago

ETA Coach shared ETA Coach Open Water Swims: Camp Ockanickon's video.

ETA Coach

posted 1 month ago

I'm looking forward to speaking about the The Masters Endurance Athlete tomorrow night in Haddonfield NJ. Recovery, strength training, workout selection, and nutritional requirements are just some of the topics I will be discussing! Hope to see you there. https://www.facebook.com/events/296331460792127/

ETA Coach

posted 1 month ago

So what did we learn from the breaking 2 hours marathon attempt? We already expected to see highlights of the effectiveness of drafting, so I’m excited to learn more about the specific fueling plan during the race. It seems that a once unfathomable amount of grams of carbohydrate per hour was ingested. How much? What types of carbohydrate? How much “gut training” was needed to handle this amount of carbohydrate? Most importantly, did the athletes even oxidize the added carbohydrates, and was it a contributor in the success? I’m sure we are going to hear a lot about each runner over the next few weeks from the sport scientists on the project, but, in the mean time, here are some great thoughts by other sport scientists and coaches. http://www.runnersworld.com/sweat-science/after-a-near-sub-2-marathon-whats-next http://www.runnersworld.com/2-hour-marathon/believe-it-a-sub-2-marathon-is-coming?utm_source=t.co&utm_medium=Social&utm_term=891417788&utm_campaign=Runner%E2%80%99s%20World http://sportsscientists.com/2017/05/pursuit-sub-2-marathon-next/ http://www.scienceofrunning.com/2017/05/the-2-hour-marathon-what-did-we-learn-from-a-scientific-standpoint.html https://sportsscientists.com/2017/05/eliud-kipchoge-20025/

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